Category Archives: Spain

Spicing up Dinner

Researching and putting together a menu of Moorish-influenced cuisine (refer to my earlier post here) was great fun. It was also a learning experience on how to photograph food.

Menu:

Andalusian Gazpacho
Aubergine and Chick Pea Salad
Fig Saffron Almond Cake

Plan A: stage a romantic dinner on the terrace, photograph at sunset. Shoot with candlelight, without candlelight, with light bounced from the flash, without a flash …, delete, delete,… eat the props.

Plan B: try again in the morning. Key learning: when photographing dinner, plan on having dinner for breakfast.

While the first set of photos didn’t turn out as intended, both dinner and breakfast were delicious. I hope you try out a recipe or three.

Andalusian Gazpacho

Spain Andalusian Gazpacho A velvety-smooth and fragrantly spiced gazpacho. Adapted from an Epicurious recipe found here.

Ingredients

  • 5 cm (2 inch) long piece baguette, crust discarded
  • 1 – 2 garlic cloves (adjust to your taste)
  • 10 ml (2 teaspoons) salt
  • 30 ml (2 tablespoons) Sherry vinegar (preferably “reserva”)
  • 5 ml (1 teaspoon) sugar
  • 2.5 ml (1/2 teaspoon) cumin seeds
  • 1.3 kg (2 1/2 lb) ripe tomatoes
  • 120 ml (1/2 cup) cold-pressed extra-virgin olive oil
  • for garnish: a drizzle of Sherry vinegar, 1 each small yellow, orange and green bell peppers, seeded, pith removed, finely chopped,

Directions

To bring out the flavour of the cumin, heat a pan over medium heat, add the cumin seeds and toss gently until they give off a warm, rich aroma. Allow the toasted seeds to cool, then grind using a mortar and pestle.

Soak bread in 120 ml (1/2 cup) water for 1 minute, then squeeze dry, discard water.

Blanch, then peel the tomatoes. Cut them into quarters and core, discard the core. Remove and discard the seeds.

Mash garlic to a paste with salt using a mortar and pestle (or mince garlic and mash together with salt using the flat-side of a large knife). Blend garlic paste, bread, vinegar, sugar, toasted ground-cumin, and half of tomatoes in a food processor until tomatoes are very finely chopped (about a minute or so). Add remaining tomatoes and blend until smooth. Then, with the motor running, add olive oil in a slow stream, blending until as smooth as possible.

Transfer to a glass container and chill, covered, until cold, about 3 hours. May be chilled up to 2 days.

To serve, ladle into bowls, season with salt and freshly ground pepper to taste, add a drizzle of sherry vinegar and garnish with the mixed chopped bell peppers,

Serves 4.  Preparation time: 30 minutes   Total time: 3 1/2 hours

Aubergine and Chick Pea SaladSpain Aubergine and Spinach Salad

Slightly adapted from Donna Hay’s recipe in “The New Cook” cookbook. The mint-honey-cumin yoghurt dressing is a perfect accompaniment to the spiced aubergine and chick pea mixture. Courgettes (zucchini) would work well in place of the aubergines, just reduce the sauté time.

Ingredients

  • 2 medium-sized aubergine (eggplants), sliced 6 mm (1/4 inch) thick, then cut into bite-sized pieces
  • salt
  • 45 ml (3 tablespoons) olive oil, plus more as needed
  • 1-2 cloves garlic, thinly sliced
  • 10 ml (2 teaspoons) ground coriander (cilantro)
  • 5 ml (1 teaspoon) cardamom seeds
  • 5 ml (1 teaspoon) ground cinnamon
  • 350 g (2 cups) cooked chick peas
  • 1 small bunch flat-leaf (Italian) parsley, chopped
  • 200 g (6 1/2 oz) baby spinach leaves

Dressing

  • 120 ml (1/2 cup) plain yoghurt
  • 30 ml (2 tablespoons) finely chopped mint
  • 10 ml (2 teaspoons) plain honey
  • 10 ml (2 teaspoons) ground cumin (slightly toast before grinding, refer to gazpacho recipe above)

Directions

Place aubergine (eggplant) slices in a colander, sprinkle with salt and allow to sit for 20 minutes to draw out the bitter juices. Under cold running water, thoroughly rinse eggplant (aubergine), then gently pat dry.

Heat oil in sauté pan over high heat. Add garlic, coriander, cardamom and cinnamon to pan. Reduce heat to medium and cook until aromatic (about 1 minute).

Add aubergines (eggplant) to pan and sauté, stirring occasionally, for 5 – 10 minutes until golden, adding extra olive oil to the pan as needed. Add chick peas to pan and cook for 3 minutes or until heated through. Stir in chopped parsley and remove from heat.

To make dressing, combine yoghurt, mint, honey and cumin.

To serve, place baby spinach leaves on serving plates. Top with the warm aubergine (eggplant) and chick pea mixture. Serve the yoghurt dressing on the side.

Serves 4   Preparation time: 20 minutes  Total time: 40 minutes

Fig Saffron Almond CakeSpain Fig and Saffron Cake

This was my first time baking with saffron. The saffron gives the cake a wonderful flavour, a bit like…ummm…saffron. After adding the saffron to the batter, I found the threads stuck to the beater, so make sure that you scrape the beater well.  The recipe from Saveur uses sliced peaches and plums instead of figs. I think the recipe would work with many seasonal combinations, perhaps even just topped with slivered almonds and served up with fresh fruit slices.

Ingredients

  • 270 g (1 1/2 cups) all-purpose flour (note: weight is per 1 1/2 cups of Swiss-milled flour)
  • 30 g (1/4 cup) 1/4 cup finely ground almonds
  • 7.5 ml (1 1/2 teaspoons) baking powder
  • Pinch of salt
  • 150 g (1.5 sticks, 3/4 cup) unsalted butter, room temperature
  • 225 g (1 cup) granulated sugar
  • 3 large eggs, room temperature
  • 60 ml (1/4 cup) whole milk
  • 5 ml (1 teaspoon) saffron threads (loosely piled)
  • zest of 1 lemon
  • 5 ml (1 teaspoon) pure vanilla extract
  • 6 ripe Black Mission figs, stems removed, cut in quarters, then sliced 6 mm (1/4 inch) thick
  • 30 ml (2 tablespoons) turbinado sugar

Directions

Pre-heat oven to 180 degrees C (350 degrees F). Butter and flour a 24 cm (9-inch) springform pan. Sift together flour, almond meal, baking powder and salt in a small bowl.

Using an electric mixer and a large mixing bowl, beat the softened butter and one cup of granulated sugar until light and fluffy, about 3 minutes. Beat in the eggs, one at a time, incorporating completely before adding the next.

In a small saucepan, combine the milk and saffron threads and heat until it boils then immediately remove from heat. Let steep for a minute or two, until the milk takes on a rich yellow hue. Allow to cool slightly and then pour into the batter along with the lemon zest and vanilla extract. Incorporate well. Don’t worry if the zest causes the batter to curdle, all will be fine once you add the flour.

With the mixer on the lowest speed, add the flour mixture in 3 parts and mix until well blended. Spread the prepared batter into the springform pan, gently shake the pan from side-to-side to even out the batter.

Arrange the fig slices in concentric circles on top of the batter, overlapping slightly. Sprinkle with the 30 ml (2 tablespoons) of turbinado sugar.

Bake in oven for 1 hour, or until a tester inserted into the center of the cake comes out clean.

Let cool completely before serving.

Makes one 24 cm (9 inch) cake   Preparation time: 40 minutes    Total time: 1 hour 40 minutes

Buen apetito!

 

In the Moors’ Kitchen

The Nasrid sultans offered their guests an exotic menu. Dishes of rice, eggplant, artichokes, spinach and sweet peppers filled bellies. Aromas of cumin, caraway, nutmeg, sesame, coriander, cinnamon and mint perfumed the air. Figs, dates, oranges and almonds tickled taste-buds. Cooks whipped up sweets of sherbet and marzipan using newly introduced sugar.

While Andalusia’s semi-arid climate create harsh farming conditions, the Moors found the region ideal for producing the many delectable fruits, vegetables and spices which they introduced to Spain.

Arid Landscape, Spain | (C) 2013  Bringing Beauty Home

Arid Landscape, December. Near Granada, Spain.

Spain Landscape Vineyard Photo:  Maximo Lopez | Flickr

Spain Landscape Photo: R Bolance | FlikrThe Moors also brought alcohol distillation technology to Spain. Knowledge they used to produce medicines and perfumes was later adapted by the Spaniards to distil alcoholic beverages.

Spain Orange Tree Leszek Kozlowski | Flikr.jpg

Spain Vineyared Wine Barrels Sherry

Spain Arichoke Photo jennycatpink | Flikr

Spain Almond Tree in Bloom Photo: Dorte | Flickr

Saffron Crocus Sativus PDK | Flickr

According to this link, the Moors popularized the use of saffron in Spain. After reading this Saveur article about the saffron harvest, written by food journalist and former chef, Sally Schneider, and accompanied by wonderful photos from Owen Franken, I have a new appreciation for the spice.

From field to bottle, saffron production is incredibly labour intensive. The contents of the tiny, one-half gram bottle of saffron in my cupboard came from 80 hand-picked flowers. After harvesting the flowers, workers carefully pulled the stigma from the flowers. The stigma are then dried. During the drying process, 5 kilograms of stigmas shrink to only 1 kilogram of saffron. One hectare of land yields only 3 – 5 kilograms of saffron. To put it into perspective, one hectare yields about 8,000 kilograms of fresh parsley, which results in roughly 1,000 kilograms of dried parsley. So, the same land area results in 200x more dried parsley than saffron. Given the low yields and high-degree of hand labour required, it now seems quite reasonable to me that saffron is the world’s costliest spice.

Gourmands say that Saffron from the La Mancha area of Spain is the best in the world. Husband and wife, Juan Antonio Ortiz and Maria Ángeles Serranone, are La Mancha artisanal saffron producers. They offer both saffron, under the label Molineta de Minaya, and crocus bulbs for DIYers.

I will carefully source my next saffron purchase (not ready to go the DIY saffron route just yet), most likely seeking out an artisanal producer. The growing supply of counterfeit and additive-laced saffron, which I read about while researching this post, is disconcerting.

Stay tuned for my next post. It will be a seasonal menu influenced by the cuisine of the Moors (and yes, saffron is one of the ingredients).

Photo Credits: Bringing Beauty Home, RBolance, Maximo Lopez, Leszek KozlowskiRob Winton, Robert McKintosh, jennycatpink, Dorte, OutdoorPDK

Alhambra – Colourful Impressions

William Harvey Drawing of the Alhambra

William Harvey Drawing of the Alhambra

Quote - Owen JonesThe distressed, time-worn colour palette on view at the Alhambra is right on trend (although, dare I say it, a waning trend). Traces of the once rich, vibrant paint colours create a sense of faded grandeur throughout the royal palaces.

Alhambra Colour 3 Photo Cropped  Victor Ovies | Flickr

NOW. Photo: Victor Ovies | Flickr

Photo: Phillip Clapper | Flickr

NOW. Photo: Phillip Clapper | Flickr

Photo: Phillip Capper | Flickr

NOW. Photo: Phillip Clapper | Flickr

Alhambra Colour 6 Photo Cropped FèlixGP | Flickr

NOW. Photo: FèlixGP | Flickr

Thanks to the work of British architect Owen Jones (1809-74) and French architect Jules Goury (1803-34), as well as others, we can see what the interior colour schemes likely were during the Nasrid dynasty.

In 1834, Jones and Goury visited the Alhambra, studying and making extensive sketches of its tile patterns, stucco-work and architectural features. Six months after arriving in Granada, Goury died from cholera. The grieving Jones immediately travelled back to England. He returned to the Alhambra in 1837 and completed the research. Jones published the work in a set of volumes called Plans, Elevations, Sections and Details of the Alhambra.  They were the equivalent of today’s shelter magazines, with newly developed techniques in colour printing exposing the Alhambra’s beauty to all. The meticulously coloured lithographs attest to the artistry of Jones.

Window Hall of the Two Sisters, Plans, Elevations, Sections and Details of the Alhambra 1845, Jones and Goury

THEN. Window Hall of the Two Sisters, Plans, Elevations, Sections and Details of the Alhambra 1845, Jones and Goury

The first volume, issued in 1842, generated a great deal of debate in Victorian society about the virtues of Moorish design (the lifestyle of the Moors was thought to be rather risque). Given the deep colour schemes that became popular during the era, it seems to me, that they at least embraced the colours preferred by the Moors.

With a few exceptions, the prints do not depict the colours that Jones, Goury and others actually saw when they visited the Alhambra. Rather, what their research indicated the colours would have been during the Nasrid dynasty. This new information added to the buzz created when the prints were issued. Describing the harmonious colour scheme illustrated above, Jones writes,

“On molded surfaces, they placed red, the strongest colour of the three, in the depths, where it might be softened by shadows, never on the surface; blue in the shade and gold on all surfaces exposed to light; for it is evident that by this arrangement alone could their true value be obtained.” – The Grammar of Ornament, p.72

The soft teal and green remnants that decorate the stucco today, were once brilliant blues. The colour transformation is the result of metals in the blue pigments oxidizing. Jones also concluded that under Catholic-rule, decorative elements were repainted in purple and green. For the most part, visitors today see only ivory-coloured walls, as layers of whitewash added over time conceal all but traces of the original primary colour-scheme.

Alhambra Colour 2 Photo Cropped Sara Delgado | Flickr

NOW. Photo: Sara Delgado | Flickr

Jones Chromolithograph Column

Plate 38, Actual State of the Colors, Plans, Elevations, Sections and Details of the Alhambra, Goury & Jones

From an aesthetic perspective, the Alhambra’s colourfully tiled and stuccoed rooms must have created quite an impression on visitors to the Nasrids’ courts. Imagine the utter opulence of rooms filled with the luxurious hand-loomed silk fabrics and magnificent hand-woven carpets of that time.

Model showing the Qalahurra Nuevw of Ysuf I; Interior of the Alhambra, Enrique Linares 1890 V&A Museum

THEN. Model showing the Qalahurra Nuevw of Ysuf I; Interior of the Alhambra, Enrique Linares 1890 | V&A Museum

Nasrid 14th century silk lampas weave textile fragment & wool early 15th c Murcia region carpet | Metropolitan Museum of Art

Nasrid 14th century silk lampas weave textile fragment & early 15th c Murcia region wool carpet | Metropolitan Museum of Art

Doorway Photo: Bartek Miskiewicz | Flickr

NOW. Photo: Bartek Miskiewicz | Flickr

Today, even in her faded glory, the Alhambra is still a lady with a lot of soul.

 

Added to My Reference Library Wish List:

  1. The Grammar of Ornament, Owen Jones. (not a reprint, so will likely remain on the wish list for a long time)
  2. The Ornament of the World: How Muslims, Jews and Christians Created a Culture of Tolerance in Medieval Spain, Maria Rosa Menoca.